Birmingham Special

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Birmingham Special

IN Birmingham Special in the last months of his service. Seen here in Somerset, Virginia, March 1969.

Overview
Service Type Intercity railway
Status Out of production
Locale US Northeast / US Southeast
First service May 17, 1909
Last service 1 February 1970
Former operator (s) Southern Railway,
Norfolk and Western Railroad,
Pennsylvania Railroad
Route
Start off New York, New York
the end Birmingham, Alabama
Distance traveled 987.4 miles (1589.1 km)
Service frequency Daily
Train number (s) South: 17, North: 18 (1952)
Onboard services
Seating Reclining seat trainers
Sleeping devices Open sections, roomettes, double bedrooms & drawing rooms (1952)
Public catering facilities Diner; restaurant-hall

IN Birmingham Special was a passenger train operated by the Southern Railway, the Norfolk and Western Railway, and the Pennsylvania Railway to the southeastern United States. The train began operating in 1909 and continued operation, with changes, after Amtrak took over control of most of the long-distance intercity passenger trains in the United States on May 1, 1971. Birmingham Special namesake of the famous Glenn Miller large group tune “Chattanooga Chu Chu.”

Southern Railway presented Birmingham Special May 17, 1909 Birmingham, Alabama and New York via Atlanta, Georgia and Washington, DC. Southern operated the train between Birmingham and Washington, while the Pennsylvania Railroad operated between Washington and New York.[1] The train consisted of carriages, Pullman sleepers and a dining car. Its road numbers on the Southern Railway were 29 (south) and 30 (north).[2]

May 15, 1932 Yuzhny redirected Birmingham Special via Chattanooga, Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee and Bristol, bypassing Atlanta. The Norfolk and Western Railroad was pulled by a train between Lynchburg, Virginia and Bristol, creating an unusual (though not unique) situation. Birmingham Special using two unconnected sections of the Southern Railroad: Washington-Lynchburg and Bristol-Birmingham.[1][3] In the 1950s, the train included several types of berths for the New York-Birmingham train.[4]

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While riding this incarnation of the train, Mac Gordon and Harry Warren wrote “Chattanooga Choo Choo”.[5] Lyrics of a song that is not mentioned Birmingham Special directly by name, mention boarding the train on track 29 to Pennsylvania Station, which never had track 29. Also, when the song was recorded in 1941, Birmingham Special used an electric rather than a steam locomotive between New York and Washington. Ironically, the main train of the Pennsylvania Railroad’s rival, the New York Central Railroad. 20th Century Limited, used track 29 to Central Station. The time points indicated reflect freedom of rhyme and suggest Bristol will be re-routing (when it passed through North Carolina, it had not yet served Chattanooga).[нужна цитата][мнение]

In 1956, the Pennsylvania ended her service north of Washington. By 1964, the sleeper service was discontinued. However, a longer route, following the same route to Chattanooga, southern Pelican, sleeping cars have been preserved. [6]Through the Memphis, Tennessee service (the Chattanooga connection) ended on January 31, 1967. Birmingham Special name February 1, 1970. Service south of Bristol ended on August 11, 1970, although a large train continued north from Birmingham to the Alabama-Tennessee border for several months.[1] The train was the last to serve Chattanooga. End station.[7]

Norfolk & Western joined Amtrak after the latter began operations on May 1, 1971. However, Amtrak chose not to operate part of the Lynchburg-Bristol train.[8] The Southern Railroad, which did not initially join Amtrak, continued to operate an unnamed train between Washington and Lynchburg until June 1, 1975, designated # 7 (south) and # 8 (north).[1][9] Southern Railway joined Amtrak in 1979.

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Recommendations

  1. ^ but b c d Baer, ​​Christopher T. (September 8, 2009). “NAMED PRR TRAINS INCLUDING SERVICES” (PDF)… Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society… Received May 7, 2011.
  2. ^ “Birmingham Special”. Southern merchant. 21 (31). May 24, 1909… Received May 7, 2011.
  3. ^ “Through passenger traffic”. A LIFE. 22 (18). May 5, 1947… Received 2011-05-07.
  4. ^ 1952 Southern Schedule Table G http://streamlinermemories.info/South/SOU52TT.pdf
  5. ^ Coates, Dan (2008). Decade after decade of the 1940s: ten years of popular hits, arranged for EASY PIANO. Alfred Music Publishing… Received May 7, 2011.
  6. ^ 1964 Southern Schedule, Table G http://streamlinermemories.info/South/SRR64-4TT.pdf
  7. ^ Strickland, Justin W. (2009). Chattanooga Terminal Station… Arcadia Publishing House… Received May 7, 2011.
  8. ^ “Passenger trains running the day before from Amtrak”… Received May 7, 2011.
  9. ^ Amtrak (November 14, 1971). “National timetables for intercity passenger transportation”… Received May 7, 2011.

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